Archive for the ‘First Aid’ Category

Infectious Diseases

Saturday, May 13th, 2006

Emergency Preparedness – Infectious Diseases
 

    The biggest threats of infectious disease after disasters don’t come from dead or decaying bodies, or even spoiled food.  They result from failure of basic public-health services:  sewage disposal and water purification.  That means disaster victims are at risk for enteric disease – intestinal illness.  The culprits:
E. coli:  common cause of diarrhea, cramping, diminished fluids and malnutrition.
Vibrio cholera:  mostly eradicated in the U.S., but acquired from poorly cooked shellfish in the South.
Salmonella caused dysentery, more harsh than E coli, brings fever, and bloody and mucousy discharges.
Typhoid fever:  Salmonella in the bowel causes high fever and dehydration to damage other organs.
    Modern medicine deals pretty well with all of these problems by prescribing antibiotics and antidiarrheals and by aggressively replacing lost body fluids and salts intravenously to those unable to drink.  The more distant or limited the medical care, the more personal hygiene knowledge, stored resources and vigilance against exposure are essential for survival.
    So much of medical practice depends on electrical power.  No air conditioning,  no refrigeration, limited transportation and degraded hospitals could easily return medical care to the 19th century.  To have clean water to drink and to wash your hands with sanitizing soap could be most important until the doctor comes.
   For more information contact (your emergency preparedness specialist).
SEE THE NEED AND THEN PROCEED, TO BE PREPARED.

Good Bedside Manners

Saturday, May 13th, 2006

Emergency Preparedness – Good Bedside Manners
 

   “Oh goodness, he’s going to need a lot of stitches,” said the Provo nurse in a voice burdened with fear.  Fished out of the municipal pool semi-conscience after my diving collision with a kid at age 9, I wasn’t even aware my scalp was split until I touched it and found blood.  I started to cry, still not feeling any pain.
   “Don’t ever tell someone how badly they are hurt, even if they are holding their insides in their hands,” a medic told me.  You state: “You’re going to be alright and help is on the way right now!”
   “We want to see where you had your operation,” the home teacher said.  The recent kidney donor hurt from her giggle and said, “I’m too modest to show you, but I am happy you came to visit me.”
   “We were just asking if you’d like to take a drive past your hospital,” was the quip.
   In an emergency, you may only have band-aids, the priesthood, and a good sense of humor to help someone in need.  Polish up on some one-liners.  It’s okay to quote someone else if you aren’t spontaneous with jokes.  Humor generates endorphins and can be a healing balm.  Even if you have a good first aid kit, MAKE ‘EM LAUGH.  It’s easier to find a pulse.
   For more information contact (your emergency preparedness specialist).
CATCH THE VISION, GET FACTS, DEVELOP SKILLS, AND BE PREPARED.

72 Hour Emergency Kit — #6 First Aid.

Friday, May 5th, 2006

72 Hour Emergency Kit — #6  First Aid
 

     Never put anything in your first aid kit you don’t know how to use.  First responders never seem to have enough materials in an emergency unless they have a professional kit.  So, why not put your kit together where the professionals go for their supplies.
     Look in the yellow pages under “First Aid Supplies”, or “Medical Equipment and Supplies”, and ask if they wholesale to paramedics.  Ask if they can help you custom build your kit based on your space, knowledge, and budget.  In Salt Lake City, Stat Medical Supply at 4894 So. 300 W. #2, will help you do just that.  Don’t forget to include special medications or items your family members uniquely need.
     For more ideas contact (your emergency preparedness specialist).
DO IT, DO IT RIGHT, AND DO IT RIGHT NOW.

First Responder Kits.

Friday, May 5th, 2006

Emergency Preparedness – First Responder Kits.
 

     A 72-hour kit IS NOT the foundation of a home preparedness program.  But, it’s a start.
     What are the essentials of a three day First Responder Kit?  (priority order)

  1. Water
  2. Food                               Considerations:   “Will it all fit into something
  3. Clothing                                                        that won’t break my back?”
  4. Shelter                                                        “Can technology lighten my load?”
  5. Sanitation                                                   “Will I be able to afford it?”
  6. First Aid                                                     “I don’t want something else that will
  7. Communication                                           just sit and decay for lack of use!”
  8. Transportation

     Each week we will treat one topic.  Get ready and build your kits and involve the whole family.
     For more information contact (your emergency preparedness specialist).
CATCH THE VISION, GET FACTS, DEVELOP SKILLS, AND BE PREPARED.

Combat Multipliers.

Friday, May 5th, 2006

Emergency Preparedness – Combat Multipliers.

 

     In combat some weapons, equipment or personnel prove to be exponential in their power to effect results on the battlefield.  Their contribution or absence proves to be key to the outcome. 

     Today’s battles, even with very high tech communications equipment, sometimes require the surest means for message traffichand and arm signals.
     Deacons are critical to command functions that Bishops shoulder.  As messengers for the Bishop they can be a means of communication if they prepare to fill that Aaronic Priesthood role.  DC 20:59 specifically says they are “to warn, expound, exhort, and teach, and invite all to come unto Christ.”
     In case of emergencies, however, they need to additionally be self-sustaining.  Scouting, as the activity arm of the priesthood, teaches emergency preparedness skills through merit badge requirements.  A 72-hour kit is one of the requirements in case the Deacon is called upon as a first responder for the Bishop.
     The next few weeks’ articles will focus on the essentials of first responder kits (72 hour kits).  Parents, assist your young men to prepare to fulfill their important priesthood role, and then do likewise for all family members.  Your emergency preparedness specialist (name and phone number) can help.
CATCH THE VISION, GET FACTS, DEVELOP SKILLS, AND BE PREPARED.

Medical Moments

Tuesday, April 18th, 2006

     “My baby has been running at both ends for more than a week,” my Home Teaching young mother said when she brought her daughter to my home for a blessing before going to a doctor’s appointment. 

     “Did you know that chamomile and catnip teas can cure colic,” I asked?

     “Where were you when my first three kids almost died of colic,” she charged?

     As the baby nursed on the warm brew the blessing was given – and the doctor appointment never kept. 

     My own son’s badly burned hand was quickly bathed in aloe vera juice from the plant on our kitchen counter and put in a clean sock for a bandage, as just as quickly a Father’s blessing was administered.  This resulted in no lost sleep or scaring to the infant who had explored the curious glowing coil on the stove.

     “I have great concern for the time when the Saints will trust the medical practitioners more than the powers of the priesthood,” said Brigham Young.

     Whether the powers of faith or the skills of physicians, prepare with experience from both.  For consecrated oil and blessings, see your priesthood leaders.  For all else, call Nurse Line:  (800) 267-9476.

     For more information, call (your emergency preparedness specialist)

CATCH THE VISION, GET FACTS, DEVELOP SKILLS, AND BE PREPARED.