Archive for the ‘Safety’ Category

Sizable Seismic Events

Saturday, May 13th, 2006

Emergency Preparedness – Sizable Seismic Events
 

   Worldwide 284,010 people died in 2004, and 89,354 in 2005, in earthquakes, Utah’s biggest threat.

   An earthquake is Mother Nature exercising her option to reshuffle resources.  She is quite regular about it, too.  During the week ending 2/3/2006, there were 146 quakes in the world of 2.5+, 62 quakes were greater than 4.0, and one was 6.7 on the Richter scale.  Of the total, 85 quakes were in the US with all but 22 being in Alaska (state motto:  we’ll make the earth move under your feet).  The 6.7 in Fiji was a SEW (somebody else’s worry).  But 13 in California and 2 in Nebraska put us in the realm of possibility.  Utah actually had 7 quakes in the last week, but each was under 2.5.

   Seismologists tell us we have a 1 in 4 chance of a 7+ quake within 50 years.  Utah just spent $200 million for seismic renovation on the capitol building and the LDS Church is doing the same kind of renovation on the tabernacle on Temple Square.  Consider your preparedness following these examples.
   Have a place for everything and everything in its place.  You won’t leave your resources after a rumble.  The most important thing is to know where to start digging to recover water, food, clothing and shelter.
   For information check out www.earthquake.usgs.gov and see what Mother Nature is doing this week.
SEE THE NEED AND THEN PROCEED, TO BE PREPARED.

10 Safety Musts for the Home.

Saturday, May 13th, 2006

Emergency Preparedness – 10 Safety Musts for the Home.

  1. Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors
  2. Fire extinguishers easily accessible and located away from hazard areas
  3. First aid supplies and kits for vehicles
  4. Flash lights and/or chem.-lights for power outages
  5. Utilities shut off tools and instructions for water, gas, and electricity
  6. A family evacuation plan, including emergency phone numbers
  7. A sturdy step stool
  8. Rubber-backed mats and non-slip throw rugs
  9. Grab bars and non-slip appliqués in bath facilities
  10. Indoor nightlights and sensor-triggered outdoor area lights.

   For more information contact (your emergency preparedness specialist.)

SEE THE NEED AND THEN PROCEED, TO BE PREPARED.

First Responder Kits.

Friday, May 5th, 2006

Emergency Preparedness – First Responder Kits.
 

     A 72-hour kit IS NOT the foundation of a home preparedness program.  But, it’s a start.
     What are the essentials of a three day First Responder Kit?  (priority order)

  1. Water
  2. Food                               Considerations:   “Will it all fit into something
  3. Clothing                                                        that won’t break my back?”
  4. Shelter                                                        “Can technology lighten my load?”
  5. Sanitation                                                   “Will I be able to afford it?”
  6. First Aid                                                     “I don’t want something else that will
  7. Communication                                           just sit and decay for lack of use!”
  8. Transportation

     Each week we will treat one topic.  Get ready and build your kits and involve the whole family.
     For more information contact (your emergency preparedness specialist).
CATCH THE VISION, GET FACTS, DEVELOP SKILLS, AND BE PREPARED.

Combat Multipliers.

Friday, May 5th, 2006

Emergency Preparedness – Combat Multipliers.

 

     In combat some weapons, equipment or personnel prove to be exponential in their power to effect results on the battlefield.  Their contribution or absence proves to be key to the outcome. 

     Today’s battles, even with very high tech communications equipment, sometimes require the surest means for message traffichand and arm signals.
     Deacons are critical to command functions that Bishops shoulder.  As messengers for the Bishop they can be a means of communication if they prepare to fill that Aaronic Priesthood role.  DC 20:59 specifically says they are “to warn, expound, exhort, and teach, and invite all to come unto Christ.”
     In case of emergencies, however, they need to additionally be self-sustaining.  Scouting, as the activity arm of the priesthood, teaches emergency preparedness skills through merit badge requirements.  A 72-hour kit is one of the requirements in case the Deacon is called upon as a first responder for the Bishop.
     The next few weeks’ articles will focus on the essentials of first responder kits (72 hour kits).  Parents, assist your young men to prepare to fulfill their important priesthood role, and then do likewise for all family members.  Your emergency preparedness specialist (name and phone number) can help.
CATCH THE VISION, GET FACTS, DEVELOP SKILLS, AND BE PREPARED.

Support Our Troops.

Friday, May 5th, 2006

Emergency Preparedness – Support Our Troops.

 

     “To none is freedom more dear than to those who have bled and fought to preserve it.”
     The USO is a great organization few seem to know much about.  “Isn’t it a government program from World War II to entertain the troops,” questioned a traveler who saw their sign in a major US airport?
     Like the Boy Scouts, the USO is chartered by Congress as a non-profit public funded organization that provides essential and unique services to support servicemen and their families.  Operation Phone Home, cyber canteens, Operation Care Package, mobile canteens, fleet support centers, AND entertainment around the world are provided the troops.  Also, overseas community centers, childcare services, education programs and family centers are provided for dependents.
     The military has not only preserved us against foes, but has given great education and skills training to our men and women and to citizens of other countries in which freedom has had beginnings.  As warriors for basic human rights it is not hard to see why soldiers have opened doors for our LDS missionaries to follow with the gospel of agency and accountability.
     Watch for a USO next time you pass through a major airport.  Visit them at www.uso.org and help.
For more information contact (your ward emergency preparedness specialist).
CATCH THE VISION, SUPPORT FREEDOMS FIGHT, AND BE PREPARED.

Living With a Mean Mother

Tuesday, April 18th, 2006

     On Good Friday, 1964, at 5:36 pm, Mother Nature dealt out a Richter 9.1 earthquake centered north of Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula.  It leveled the port town of Whittier ten miles east of the epicenter, and dropped 3rd and 4th streets 30 feet in Anchorage 70 miles to the west.  With a force equal to 1,000 Hiroshima bombs the quake went on for 4 minutes and left 90% of all Alaskans without power, water, sewer, and supplies.  Fortunately, airport runways did not buckle, and the first relief began to arrive by air after 48 hours.

     Alaskans love Mother Nature and live to get lost in her beauty.  Her entire southern coast line is part of the Ring of Fire, a distance of more than 3,500 miles.  If you cut Alaska in half, Texas would still be the third largest state in the Union.  This is to say that Alaska has 90% of all seismic activity in North America and is furthest from outside help.  That is why Alaskans respect the problems that tremors, temperatures and distance can pose, and everyone prepares their homes for Mother Nature’s worst moods. 

     If Mother Nature gets mad and you are prepared, you need never have to go to bed without your supper.

     For more information contact  (your emergency preparedness specialist).

CATCH THE VISION, GET FACTS, DEVELOP SKILLS AND BE PREPARED.

Fire and Water

Tuesday, April 18th, 2006

     After drugs and alcohol, the two most destructive elements in the home are fire and water.  The original  discovers of fire and water had a tenth the devastation  problems in their dwellings than we have now in modern homes.  Fire ruins quickly while water works slow.  Guard the matches.  Check for leaks.

     Did you know that 90% of house fires start in the kitchen?  Did you also know that 90% of fire extinguishers are located in the kitchen, too?  What’s wrong with this picture?  Neither those extinguishers nor water can do much for kitchen fires since most are grease fires and will spread if attacked by waterTHINK THROUGH EQUIPMENT AND FIRE SAFETY PROCEDURES.  Compared to the caveman, your more might be less unless you can extinguish your problems.

     For more information call (your emergency preparedness specialist).

CATCH THE VISION, GET THE FACTS, DEVELOP SKILLS, AND BE PREPARED.

Be Safe

Tuesday, April 18th, 2006

        FOD is not something to worry about – unless you are in aviation.  Then, it can be everything.
Anything out of place is FOD:  anything that can produce (F)oreign (O)bject (D)amage to an aircraft.  A paper clip or a pebble on the runway, a hat, a tool, a bird — anything that can go through an engine except fuel and air is FOD.  You will never see a cluttered airport.  Aviation has to be a tidy industry.  People’s lives depend on NO FOD for safety. 

     Your preparedness program should consider having everything in its right place, to include needed equipment like good gloves, flashlights, a pry bar, hard hat, or tools necessary to put things back in place.  Earthquakes have a tendency to turn almost everything in the home into FOD.  Fallen trees, a brick wall, collapsed shelves, and all that stuff you worked so hard to get could get you.
     Be organized.  Be safe.  Be prepared.
     For more information, call (your emergency preparedness specialist).
CATCH THE VISION, GET FACTS, DEVELOP SKILLS, AND BE PREPARED.